The World’s 10x most expensive stallions

TBR

1. GALILEO

1998 Sadler’s Wells – Urban Sea (Miswaki)
Stands: Coolmore Stud, Ireland. Fee: private

It’s a measure of the level of dominance that we have come to expect from Galileo that the figure of £6,868,424 earned by his progeny across Britain and Ireland in 2018 is suggestive of an average year. That, however, is ‘average’ in the context of Galileo’s world, where records tumble and classic winners flow with clockwork regularity. read more..


2. DEEP IMPACT

2002 Sunday Silence – Wind In Her Hair (Alzao)
Stands: Shadai Stallion Station, Japan. Fee: 40 million yen (£289,000)

Deep Impact remains Japan’s answer to Galileo, and is by far the most expensive sire in his homeland as a result. A year-end total of 6,926,712,000 yen was enough to see him land his seventh consecutive Japanese sires’ championship, while a group of 47 juvenile winners played their part in Shadai’s supersire gaining his eighth champion 2-year-old sire title. All the while, his standing as a major international force continues to grow, as does the idea that he is on the cusp of becoming a broodmare sire of note. read more..


3. DUBAWI

2002 Dubai Millennium – Zomaradah (Deploy)
Stands: Dalham Hall Stud, UK. Fee: £250,000

Darley’s flagship stallion Dubawi hit an important milestone in July when becoming the only British-based stallion to reach 100 Group/Graded winners. Along the way there have been 38 G1 winners led by the Newmarket 2000 Guineas winners Makfi and Night Of Thunder, a leading light of the Hong Kong sprint ranks in Lucky Bubbles, popular older horses such as Al Kazeem and Postponed, and even a pair of Dubai World Cup winners in Monterosso and Prince Bishop. read more..


4. WAR FRONT

2003 Danzig – Starry Dreamer (Rubiano)
Stands: Claiborne Farm, USA. Fee: $250,000 (£197,000)

War Front embarks on his third season at a fee of $250,000, although off-the-record reports suggest that breeders have often paid far more to secure a nomination to the horse, who rarely covers more than 110 mares a year. Officially, however, War Front heads into 2019 as America’s most expensive stallion, a far cry from the days when he was standing within the $10,000 – $15,000 bracket. read more..


5. TAPIT

2001 Pulpit – Tap Your Heels (Unbridled)
Stands: Gainesway Farm, USA. Fee: $225,000 (£178,000)

Three-time American champion sire Tapit drops to $225,000 from $300,000 for 2019. Tapit stood his first $300,000 season in 2015 when in the midst of a golden era that peaked in 2016 with a whopping prize-money haul of $19.2 million. The son of Pulpit checked in at $12,864,453 this time around. It’s a very respectable figure but one that places him in fifth on a leading sires’ list that has come to be skewed by the Pegasus World Cup. read more..


6. FRANKEL

2008 Galileo – Kind (Danehill)
Stands: Banstead Manor Stud, UK. Fee: £175,000

Juddmonte took the decision to raise Frankel’s fee from £125,000 to £175,000 for the 2018 season, and 12 months on the move looks vindicated. Cracksman, winner of the Qipco Champion Stakes, Coronation Cup and Prix Ganay, led the way among a quartet of G1 winners in 2018 that also ranged from G1-winning miler Without Parole to stayer Call The Wind, winner of the Prix du Cadran. As such, he finished fourth on the leading European sires’ table, despite having fewer crops on the ground than many of his rivals. read more..


7. MEDAGLIA D’ORO

2000 El Prado – Capuccino Bay (Bailjumper)
Stands: Jonabell Farm USA. Fee: $200,000 (£158,000)

The 2017 season, with the presence of seven G1 winners, was always going to be an incredibly hard act to follow for Medaglia d’Oro. Nevertheless, 2018 was peppered by a number of highlights for the Darley American stalwart, notably Wonder Gadot’s sweep of the Queen’s Plate and Prince Of Wales’s Stakes following her runner-up effort to Monomoy Girl in the Kentucky Oaks. read more..


8. CURLIN

2004 Smart Strike – Sherriff’s Deputy (Deputy Minister)
Stands: Hill ’n’ Dale Farm, USA. Fee: $175,000 (£138,000)

Curlin’s switch to Hill ’n’ Dale Farm in 2016 came in the aftermath of the sale of a 20 percent share in the horse for approximately $6.2 million to John Sikura’s Hill ’n’ Dale Farm and Elevage II. Curlin had just completed his seventh season at Lane’s End Farm, that year at a fee of ‘just’ $35,000. This season, the two-time American Horse of the Year is due to stand for $175,000, up from $150,000 in 2018. read more..


9 (tied). SNITZEL

2002 Redoute’s Choice – Snippets’ Lass (Snippets)
Stands: Arrowfield Stud, Australia. Fee: A$220,000 (£122,000)

Snitzel continues to rewrite the history books in Australia.

The Arrowfield resident, winner of the 2006 G1 Oakleigh Plate, won his first championship in 2017 with an all-time record Australian earnings of A$16.2 million. That same year, he also led the way among all 2yo and 3yo sires while equalling Danehill’s record of 26 Australian stakes winners.

Better was to come during the 2017-18 season as, aided by Redzel’s win in the inaugural A$10 million running of The Everest, not to mention other G1 winners Estijaab, Trapeze Artist and Russian Revolution, Snitzel smashed the Australian earnings record yet again, this time with a figure A$29,243,613 – approximately A$13.3 million more than his closest pursuer, I Am Invincible. He was also Australia’s leading sire of 2yos and 3yos as well as overall by number of winners and stakes winners.

As a result, Arrowfield raised Snitzel’s fee to A$220,000 for the 2018 Southern Hemisphere season and, given he is way out in front again this time around – with Redzel’s second win in The Everest laying a healthy foundation, he is already responsible for the winners of approximately A$13.5 million, a further fee rise for 2019 may well be on the cards. Snitzel was tenth in the TRC Global Rankings at the end of 2018 


9 (tied). SEA THE STARS

2006 Cape Cross – Urban Sea (Miswaki)
Stands: Gilltown Stud, Ireland. Fee: €135,000 (£122,000)

Sea The Stars’ fee holds steady at €135,000 following a year that arguably marked a personal best for the stallion. The Tsui family’s homebred was represented by two of the leading lights of the British scene in Sea Of Class and Stradivarius, both runners in possession of the class and tough constitution often associated with their sire. read more..